Text: Serge Van Heertum & Pictures: Serge Van Heertum, Jacques Vincent & Marc Arys - Translation: Marc Arys  ©sbap 2020
  
The early years
(Courtesy Eindhoven Airport media center via web)
KampfGeschwader 30 was based at Eindhoven as from September 1st, 1940
(DR via web)
Eindhoven airport in the 1980's
(Old postcard via internet)
The same more recently
(Courtesy Eindhoven Airport media center via web)
 
Eindhoven Airbase and Eindhoven Airport

Eindhoven Airport (IATA: EIN, ICAO: EHEH) is an airport located at 7,6 kilometers west of Eindhoven city in Northern Brabant (Holland). In terms of the number of served passengers, it is the second largest airport in the Netherlands, with 6.2 million passengers in 2018. The airport is used both by civilian and military traffic.
The airport was founded in 1932 as a grass strip under the name Vliegveld Welschap (Welschap Airfield). In 1939 the airfield was acquired by the Netherland Air Force, as concerns over a military conflict with Germany increased. The airfield was quickly captured by German forces during the Battle of the Netherlands and used by them under the name Fliegerhorst Eindhoven. The airfield was expanded and improved by the Germans, with three paved runways and numerous hangars and buildings constructed.
The airfield was captured by American paratroopers during Operation Market Garden. Damage to the airfield was repaired and the airfield was re-used as an Advanced Landing Ground by both US Air Force and Royal Air Force under the designation B-78.

The airfield was handed back to the Royal Netherlands Air Force in 1952 and became the home base of many fighter types like the Republic F-84G Thunderjet, Republic F-84F Thunderstreak, Northrop NF-5A/B and last but not least the Lockheed-Martin (former General Dynamics) F-16A/B Fighting Falcon. The 316 Squadron was equipped with the F-16's but was sadly disbanded in April 1994.

 
Republic F-84G Thunderjet (K-6 / TP-25) 306 Sqn Eindhoven as from 1952
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Republic F-84G Thunderstreak (P-172) 315 Sqn Eindhoven as from 1956
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Northrop NF-5A (K-3045) 314 Sqn Eindhoven as from 1972
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Northrop NF-5B (K-4011) 316 Sqn Eindhoven as from 1971
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Lockheed Martin (General Dynamics) F-16A (J-020) 316 Sqn Eindhoven as from 1991
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 
In 1984 a terminal building for civilian air traffic was built, based on a design of Leo de Bever.
After the end of the Cold War, the military side of Eindhoven airfield was transformed into a military transport base. Initially it was home of the local production Fokker F27-300M Troopship aircraft. Over the years Eindhoven became the home base of the KLU transport aircraft like the Fokker 50, Fokker 60, McDonnell Douglas KDC-10, Lockheed C-130H Hercules and Gulfstream IV.

On the civilian side, the airport continued to grow and is now the second-largest airport in the Netherlands. To accommodate this, work to further expand Eindhoven airport started in early 2012, including the addition of a 120-room Tulip Inn Hotel.
Passenger facilities available include : exchange office, lost property office, luggage lockers, baby changing area, health center and various shops, such as Rituals, AH to GO, Victoria's Secret and tax free shops : Travel Plaza and Travel luxury, but also new Business Lounge Aspire by Swissport.

Furthermore, Eindhoven Airport offers a variety of restaurants, bars and cafes, such as: Upstairs (the Tulip Inn Hotel bar), The Bar (a flagship of Bavaria beer) and Starbucks (both before and after the security check). A business center is available too. There are 1.500 parking spaces for long and short term parking.

 
Fokker F-27-100 "Friendship" Mk 100 (C-2) 334 Sqn Eindhoven as from 1992
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Fokker F-27 "Troopship" Mk.300M (C-8) 334 Sqn Eindhoven as from 1992
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Fokker 50 (U-05) 334 Sqn Eindhoven as from 1996
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Fokker 60 "Enforcer" (U-03) 334 Sqn Eindhoven as from 1996
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Lockheed C-130H-30 "Hercules" (G-273) 336 Sqn Eindhoven as from 1994
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Lockheed C-130H "Hercules" (G-781) 336 Sqn Eindhoven as from 2010
(Serge Van Heertum©)
McDonnell Douglas KDC-10-30CF (T-235) 334 Sqn Eindhoven as from 1995
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Gulfstream Aerospace G.IV (V-11) 334 Sqn Eindhoven as from 1995
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 
Eindhoven Airbase is also the location of the European Air Transport Command…
The command was established in 2010 with a view to provide a more efficient management of the participating nations assets and resources in this field.
The European Air Transport Command (EATC) is the command center that handles the operational control of the majority of the aerial refueling capabilities and military transport fleets of a consortium of seven European Union (EU) member states (Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Spain, Italy).
The European Air Transport command was officially established on July 1st, 2010. On September 1st, 2010 the inauguration took place at Eindhoven, in presence of political and military leaders of the four basic participating nations (France, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium). On November 22nd, 2012 Luxembourg acceded to the organization and in July 2014 Spain followed. Italy formalized in December 2014 to join EATC with 37 aircraft.
The command also bears a limited responsibility for exercises, aircrew training and the harmonization of relevant national air transport regulations.
On September 1st, 2010 the EATC took over the operational control of most of the participating nation's military cargo aircraft (excluding helicopters) of which the existing fleet of Transall C-160D and Lockheed C-130H Hercules form the largest part. In the future all Airbus A400M shall be put under the command of the EATC (beginning with the official delivery to the nations). A strong motivation for the establishment of the EATC was the limited availability of assets and the operational necessity to co-operate very closely.
The combined fleet under the authority of the EATC in 2015 was a total of 220 aircraft representing 75% of the European air transport capacity.
In June 2020, the first of the eight Airbus MRTT ("Multi Role Tanker Transport") refueling aircraft jointly ordered by six European countries, including Belgium, was delivered and arrived at Eindhoven airbase, the future home base of this multinational fleet.
The "MRTT Multinational Fleet" (MMF) brings together the Netherlands, Luxembourg, Norway, Germany, Belgium and the Czech Republic. Belgium signed an agreement in February 2018 granting it a thousand flight hours per year, or the equivalent of an A330 MRTT for an amount of 250 million euros.
These planes are designed to carry out in-flight refueling, passenger or material transport missions, but also medical evacuation missions (Medevac).
The Airbus A330 MRTT's are acquired by the NATO Support and Procurement Agency (NSPA) based in Luxembourg. The fleet will therefore be owned by NATO and will all be registered in the Netherlands.
 
 
Airbus A330 MRTT T-054 (c/n MRTT054) delivered the 10-08-2020
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Airbus A330 MRTT T-055 (c/n MRTT055) delivered the 30-06-2020
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 
 
Eindhoven International Airport activities
 
The day is breaking on the airport tarmac
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Transavia operates a significant number of flights from Eindhoven
(Serge Van Heertum©)
The amazing silhouette of the Bombardier BD-700-1A11 Global 5000 (PH-BEJ)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Early morning take off for the Boeing 737-8K2 PH-HXO (c/n 62577)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
VR speed PH-HXO
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Boeing 737-8K2 PH-HZW (c/n 29345)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Boeing 737-8K2 PH-HXJ (c/n 62159)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Boeing 737-8K2 PH-HXM (c/n 62165)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Boeing 737-8K2 PH-HXF (c/n 62153)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Airbus A321-231 HA-LXU (c/n 7763) WizzAir - Eindhoven is a busy airport for this Hungarian charter company
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Bombardier Challenger 850 (CL-600-2B19) 9H-ILB (c/n 8107) VistaJet
(Jacques Vincent©)
Cessna 510 Citation MustangOO-PRM (c/n 0125) Luxaviation (Abelag)
(Jacques Vincent©)
The airport is also frequented by business aviation
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Airbus A321-231 HA-LXJ (c/n 7316)
(Marc Arys©)
Boeing 737-8AS(WL) EI-DHZ (c/n 33583) RyanAir
(Marc Arys©)
Brazilian elegance on landing
(Serge Van Heertum©)
The civil and military mix is obvious
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Airbus A320-232 HA-LWD (c/n 4351)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
The three main charter companies that frequent Eindhoven Airport
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Taxiway blue lights
(Serge Van Heertum©)
...in the name of love?
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Transavia CFM International CFM56-7B27 engine...
(Serge Van Heertum©)
...and WizzAir International Aero Engines IAE V2527-A5 engine
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Embraer ERJ-190LR D-AWSI (c/n 190-0074) from WDL Aviation with some remain Braathens Regional Airlines markings
(Serge Van Heertum©)
PH-HXO is back...
(Serge Van Heertum©)
...PH-HXF also
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Second rotation for the HA-LWD
(Jacques Vincent©)
Legacy landing
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Embraer ERJ 135BJ Legacy 650 D-ATOP (c/n 145-01233) Air Hamburg
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Business gate 2
(Serge Van Heertum©)
"Park Brake Off"...Load and clear Sir
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Private security on the airport...Renault Twizy ZE (Electric range 90 km)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Airport ground handling team
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Towbarless tractor Expediter 310
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Home delivery of spare parts
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Twin WizzAir
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Airbus A321-231 HA-LXS (c/n 7702)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Airbus A320-232 HA-LWC (c/n 4323)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Airbus face
(Serge Van Heertum©)
At the gate
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Airbus A320-232 HA-LPW (c/n 3947)
(Jacques Vincent©)
When the soldier meets the tourist
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Pink nose and Heer Hauptman
(Serge Van Heertum©)
This photo recalls the golden 70's and the open terraces of Zaventem airport 
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Another businessman goes
(Serge Van Heertum©)
  

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