Text: Serge Van Heertum - Pictures: Serge Van Heertum, Anthony Graulus & Pierre Taquet - Translation: Marc Arys
© sbap 2019
 

The concept of the North Weald Jet Fest was launched in 2018 and following the success of this inaugural event, the organizers launched the second edition between Friday 27th and Sunday 29th of September. The goal is to gather more and more preserved jet aircraft during the event. Some of the jets are in airworthy conditions, some others are able to perform runs and some are only foreseen as static display.
For the 2019 edition, it was also planned to welcome the Aero Legends Association and add the Vintage Fest 19 to Jet Fest 19. It was a very clever idea to bring along Spitfire, Harvard, Tiger Moth and other Bulldogs.
But the weather conditions of the weekend decided in another way and due to the sometimes heavy wind, most of the planned vintage aircraft didn't make it to North Weald. Safety first is the only correct way in this case.
Sadly, as you will see in the pictorial report, for the same reasons, there were also less jet activities.

Regardless of the weather, the organizers did their best to offer the public a pleasant and interesting visit with some guest stars like the 230 Squadron of the RAF with a 'Tiger' decorated Puma helicopter.
In one word, Jet Fest is a pleasant concept and we are sure that the next edition will be held in better weather conditions, allowing us to go back in time to the fabulous 1960 - 1970 jet era.
The SBAP team would like to thanks the organizers and particularly Mr James Edwards for the warm welcome and talk during our stay at North Weald.
So stay tuned and don't hesitate to cross the Channel, heading this mythic historical place and meet the Jets on the next Jet Fest event.

   
(Google Earth)
 
The site photographed by a German plane in 1939
(British Archives Dr)
North Weald airfield today
(Dr via web)
 
North Weald short history
 

World War I:  
An area of land to the west of North Weald Bassett was acquired in 1916 for the development of a Home Defence airfield. By summer 1916 the still simple landing ground was open, and received a detachment of the 39 Squadron BE2C's equipped. The first operational patrol mission was held on 23 and 24 of August. The North Weald patrols were planned to counter the German Zeppelins attacks and the first success was recorded on the night of 2 and 3 September. The night of the 1-2 October saw another success for the squadron, when the L31 was shot down in the Potters Bar area.
The Zeppelin menace was now over but by spring of 1917 the Germans started mass raids by day with the famous Gotha heavy bomber aircraft. With this new way of attacks, the old BE2C was clearly outclassed and the 39 Squadron was reorganized. The new aircraft, the Bristol F2b Fighter, became the mount of the squadron and the fleet was entirely concentrated at North Weald.
The first success was achieved on May 20th, 1918 when a Gotha was shot down over East Ham. This was one of the last German raids and the 39 Squadron left North Weald to move on to the continent and continue the War from there.
By the end of 1919 the airfield was abandoned.

 
Royal Aircraft Factory BE2c, the Zeppelin killer
(Coll Denis Eusicom)
Bristol F2B Fighter, the Gotha nightmare
(Coll Denis Eusicom)
 
Between the War:  
The rebuilt of the site started in 1926 and the airfield reopened officially on September 27th, 1927 as fighter base. The first squadron based at North Weald at that time was the 56 Squadron, equipped with the Armstrong Whitworth Siskin; coming from Biggin Hill on October 12th, followed six month later by the 29 Squadron from Duxford.
In October 1935 the 29 Squadron returned to Duxford and was replaced, in August 1936, by the 151 Squadron. Both present squadrons were reequipped with the new and modern Hurricane fighter at the end of 1938.
 
Armstrong Whitworth Siskin from 56 Squadron
(Coll Denis Eusicom)
Bristol Bulldog from 29 Squadron
(Courtesy IWM Archives)
 
World War II: 
At the start of the conflict, North Weald squadrons were mostly involved in convoy patrols. Later, between July and October 1940, known as the Battle of Britain, the squadrons were involved in many air combats and the airfield was subject to numerous Luftwaffe attacks resulting in considerable damages. The first significant attack was held on August 24th when the airfield was hit by around 200 enemy bombs killing 9 people, but a more devastating attack was held on September 3rd when all the hangars and technical facilities were hit. After this iconic battle of the Second World War, an important number of squadrons rotated at North Weald and were involved in many Circus and Rhubarb operations across the Channel between 1941 and 1944.
Although RAF North Weald station remained within the Fighter Command, the focus of operations shifted and the last operational squadron moved out in May 1944.
During the last months of the war (March 1945), the airfield was used by the anti-aircraft unit n° 1494 Flight.
 
Hawker Hurricane Mk I from 249 Squadron (code GN)
based at North Weald between September 1940 and May 1941
(Courtesy IWM Archives)
Supermarine Spitfire Mk Vb from 222 Squadron (code ZD)
based at North Weald between August 1941 and August 1942
(Royal Air Force archives©)
 
After the War: 
On May 17th, 1945, North Weald was transferred to the N°46 Group of Transport Command and became home to the Polish 301 and 304 transport squadrons. These units left the site a few weeks later and the airfield remained without based flying units.
In March 1949, two auxiliary units, the 601 and 604 Squadrons, arrived from Hendon with their Spitfire Mk LF.16. Both Squadrons were shortly after re-equipped with the new jet fighter, the Vampire and North Weald returned to its roots as a fighter airbase.
Of course the arrival of the jet fighter era, also meant the extension of the main runway. A year later the 72 Squadron joined the two others and North Weald became a standard three fighter Squadron airbase.
During this Cold War period, the airfield saw various changes with the arrival of the "Treble 1 Squadron" (111 Sqn) and their Hawker Hunter; a well-known Squadron indeed, with the famous "Black Arrows" aerobatic team and their unforgettable 22 aircraft formation looping.
But the demise of the Auxiliary Air Force in March 1957 meant the end of the airfield. The 111 Squadron moved out a few months later and North Weald was reduced to Care and Maintenance from November 15th, 1958. In 1964 the RAF withdrew from the airfield completely and the airfield remained unused until it was transferred to the British Army Command on January 4th, 1966. In 1968, parallel to Duxford airfield, North Weald was used for the making of Guy Hamilton's movie the Battle of Britain.
In August 1979, the site was sold to the Epping Forest District Council.
 
Pilots  of the 72 Squadron near the tail of a Gloster Meteor F.8 
(Courtesy IWM Archives)
De Havilland DH.100 Vampire F.3 from the 601 Auxiliary Squadron
(Coll Denis Eusicom)
Hawker Hunter F.4 from the 111 Squadron
(Courtesy IWM Archives)
The "Black Arrows" during the famous 22 aircraft loop
(Royal Air Force Archives©)
 
Civilian use: 
North Weald is now a general aviation airfield with just over 20,000 movements per year, connecting people from London and Essex, with destinations across England and abroad by air travel.
North Weald is also a home base for several vintage and veteran aircraft such as the Spitfire, Hurricane, Mustang and Kittyhawk (Hangar 11 owned by Peter Teichman), but also Dakota, Skyraider, Seafire and Harvard. North Weald is also recognized in the collection aircraft world as the home base of ex-military jets such as the Hunter, Venom, Vampire, Gnat and Jet Provost.
Resident organizations include Area 51, Hangar 11 Collection, Aces High, and Kennet Aviation.
An original 1927 hangar remains, as does the former Officers Mess, a Grade 2 listed building.
Some former married quarters dating from the early 1970s (and now in private ownership) can be seen in Lancaster and York Roads. A Hawker Hurricane Mk I replica has been erected near the main gate and can be viewed on market days.
Air Ambulance: Essex & Herts launched its Hertfordshire Air Ambulance service in 2008, based at Hangar 7 of the airfield. From 2008 until 2017, the service operated an MD902 Explorer. From August 2017, Helimed 55 was upgraded to an Agusta Westland AW169, a £5 million helicopter which the charity trust fully owns.
National Police Air Service: On September 7th, 2017 it was provisionally agreed by Epping Forest District Council to allow the National Police Air Service Unit to operate 3 helicopters and 1 fixed wing aircraft from North Weald Airfield with a 25 year lease agreement. The facility will serve as the main base for police helicopters in the London area and neighbouring counties. The police base project was built near the airfield's western perimeter in 2018 and the flying operations started in 2019.
   
   
Jet Fest 19 Static Display walk
 
The day rises on the historic airfield
(Serge Van Heertum©)
View of the control tower
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Sadly it was a windy weekend
(Serge Van Heertum©)
View of the event from the south of the field
(Serge Van Heertum©)
North Weald is an active aerodrome, firefighters are ready
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Runway check
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 
 
Vickers Supermarine Spitfire Mk IXT (NH341) 1944
NH341 was built at Castle Bromwich as a Spitfire Mk LF IXe and delivered to the Royal Air Force on the April 28th, 1944.
The plane flown only under the colours of the 411 (Code DB - Grizzly Bear) squadron RCAF. The most notable use of NH341 was in the hands of Flt Lt Hugh Charles Trainor who gained his third kill in 48 hours on June 29th, 1944 when he downed an Me109 five miles West of Caen. NH341 had been lost on the July 2nd whilst being flown by W/O J S Jeffrey who escaped unscathed after tangling with FW 190s South East of Caen. The substantial remains were placed on display at the Musee Memorial de la Bataille de Normandie at Bayeux during 1996. It was later displayed at the Juno Beach Museum at Courseulles-sur-Mer during 2003 where it was described as being ML295. Inspection of the aircraft however shows that a substantial amount of the parts originated from NH341 with only a few parts from another Spitfire. The fuselage of NH341 arrived at Historic Flying Ltd, based at The Imperial War Museum Duxford in July 2015. The restoration of this historic aircraft has been completed in a two seat Mk IXT configuration to allow Aero Legends customers to experience flying in a Spitfire.
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Front view of the NH341
(Pierre Taquet©)
War memories
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 
De Havilland DH-82A (G-PWBE * c/n LES1) 1959
(Anthony Graulus©)
 
Canadian Vickers PBY-5A Canso
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Miss Pick Up home is at Duxford
(Pierre Taquet©)
 
Douglas C-47A-75-DL “Drag ‘em oot” (N473DC * 42-100882 * c/n 19345) 1942
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Pierre Taquet©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Pierre Taquet©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 
 
Douglas C-54Q Skymaster (N44914 * 42-72525 * 56498 USN * c/n 10630) 1942
Constructed as a C-54D-1-DC by Douglas at Chicago. Taken on charge with the United States Army Air Force with s/n 42-72525. Transferred to the United States Navy with BuNo 56498 as a R5D-3. Converted to a C-54Q. Written off the US Navy and sold to Atlantic Warbirds Inc with c/r N44914 in 1972. Airworthiness certificate for N44914 (C54B-DC, 10630) issued on April 28th, 1976. Sold to Aces High US Inc, Wilmington on September 4th, 2002 and transferred to North Weald UK with the intention of making a Film about the Berlin Airlift but movie was never completed.  Civil registration, N44914, cancelled on February 13th, 2013. Bought by International Air Services Inc Trustee, Carson City, NV with c/r N44914 on February 13th, 2018.
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Anthony Graulus©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 
 
After the freshness of the early morning, it's time to take off their nightcap ...
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Not very sexy but useful
(Serge Van Heertum©)
When the rising sun plays with the morning dew
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Some RC Jets as Jet Fest visitors...Hawker Sea Hawk FB.Mk.3 (HMS Albion, during Operation Musketeer, Suez, November 1956)
(Serge Van Heertum©)




Bae Hawk T.1A RAF 63 Squadron
De Havilland DH.115 Sea Vampire T22
Hawker Hunter Mk.58A "Miss Demeanour" G-PSST
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Grumman F9F-5 Panther VF-153, USS Princeton, 1953
Northrop F-89D Scorpion 61 FIS Ernest Harmon AFB, Newfoundland, 1955
Iraq Air Force Mikoyan-Gurevich Mig-21MF Fishbed
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Mc Donnell Douglas F-4M-37-MC Phantom FGR.2 1969
(Pierre Taquet©)
This is the nose section of the XV490 with 92 Squadron markings
(Pierre Taquet©)
Cessna FA150K Aerobat (G-LALA * c/n FA1500005) 1969
No comments...
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 
The Jets on the static display
 
Hawker Hunter T.8C (WV322)
WV322 was built as an F.4 and first flown on June 8th, 1955. Delivered to the RAF the plane was operated by 43 and 92 Squadrons and then in 1959 was returned to Hawkers for conversion to a T.8C model. WV322 was delivered to the Royal Navy and operated by 764 NAS and later 809 NAS for Buccaneer pilot training. With the Buccaneer's retirement from Fleet Air Arm  service, WV322 was transferred to the RAF and flown by 237 OCU, again for Buccaneer pilot training purposes.
On retirement the plane ended up as an instructional airframe at RAF Cranwell before being put up for disposal in early 2001. 
(Pierre Taquet©)
(Anthony Graulus©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 
Aero Vodochody L-29 Delfin (G-BYCT * ES-YLH * c/n 395142)
This Delfin is an ex Estonian Air Force aircraft. It was also previously on the Estonian civil register as ES-YLH.
Between January 2003 and May 2010 the plane was based in Belgium and owned by Propeller Bvba.

(Anthony Graulus©)
(Pierre Taquet©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 
Mikoyan Gurevitch Mig-17F Fresco (PZL-Mielec Lim-5) (G-MIGG * c/n 1C1211) 1958
This aircraft is a former Polish Air Force paint like a North Vietnam Air Force Mig 17F
(Anthony Graulus©)
 
Folland Gnat F.1 Indian Air Force E296 (G-SLYR * c/n H/GN/130)
Constructed as a Gnat F Mk.1 in the UK for the Indian Air Force and taken on charge with military code E296.
After Indian Military carrer the plane was sold to David Tallichet and transferred first to Chino CA 
and afterward to George Perez, Reno NV & Glen Ellen CA Arlington Municipal Airport as N296PS.
In 2014 the aircraft was bought by Heritage Aircraft Trust, North Weald, Essex. The plane will be restaured to flying conditions and is now registerd G-SLYR.
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Anthony Graulus©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 
Folland Gnat T.Mk1 (G-MOUR * c/n FL596)
The plane was built by Folland at their Hamble factory in early 1964 and first flew on September 19th, 1964. It was accepted into RAF service on October 8th, 1964 and was allocated the serial number XS102, serving at RAF Valley with No 4 Flying Training School (FTS). It underwent various modifications at Bitteswell in February 1970 and continued its career with the 4FTS until 1978, finally being Struck Off Charge on March 31st, 1979, having completed 14 years of useful instructional service with the Royal Air Force. In civilian hands, G-MOUR wear the colours of the Yellowjacks aerobatic team and has been given the RAF serial Number XR992, in order to look more authentic as the real XR992 being one of the founding Yellowjacks airframes.
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Anthony Graulus©) (Pierre Taquet©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Pierre Taquet©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 
Folland Gnat T.Mk1 (G-FRCE * c/n FL598)
XS104 first flew on October 13th, 1964 and served with 4 FTS until July 1975 when the plane was transferred to the CFS on loan and returning to 4 FTS in April 1976. A bird strike put her out of action for the last half of May 1976 and the XS104 was damaged again in April 1978 ending its active RAF career. The aircraft was than transferred to RAF Cosford as ground instructional airframe 8604M on November 14th, 1978 and was written off in the late 1980s.
Registered as G-FRCE in a striking blue and gold paint scheme, the XS104 spent some time on the airshow circuit but the registration was cancelled on February 25th, 2000 after the owning company was wound up the month before and the plane spent some years stored out in the open at Cranfield. Jason Walker then acquired the aircraft, which despite reportedly poor condition was restored to flight once more by Kennet Aviation at North Weald and was back in the air during 2005 season. It was a brief career and by 2008 the registration was cancelled again. In late 2009 the XS104 was acquired by Red Gnat Ltd. and is now back in airworthy condition.
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Anthony Graulus©) (Pierre Taquet©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 
Folland Gnat T.Mk1 (G-NATY * c/n FL548)
XR537 came out from Folland at Hamble on June 13th, 1963 and was delivered to the RAF on July 5th, 1963. Initially issued to No.4 FTS at Valley, the XR537 moved later on to the CFS. During the CFS period the XR537 was operated by the Red Arrows team, initially as a spare but in 1976 became the No. 1 aircraft. On withdrawal from flying duties in September 1979, the XR537 was delivered to No 2 School of Technical Training at Cosford to serve as an instructional airframe, receiving serial 8642M. The plane was maintained in a ground running condition, still in her Red Arrows colours, until surplus to requirements at the end of 1989.
Sold at a Sotheby's Auction in March 1990, XR537 was moved by road to Bournemouth on April 5th, being placed on the civil register as G-NATY in June. Purchased by a private owner in December 1990, overhaul started with engine runs undertaken the following spring. However problems arose over obtaining vital replacement parts, and so XR537 remained on display in the Museum until the untimely death of her owner in 2000 put a stop to the restoration. Thankfully in 2005 Drilling Systems of Bournemouth bought the plane and de Havilland Aviation continued the restoration. XR537 was registered again as G-NATY and received official approval from the RAF to fly in her former Reds colours. Following a two-year restoration programme, XR537 was granted her Permit to test on June 14th, 2007. Unfortunately the XR537 was not seen in the air often, and with de Havilland Aviation's collapse in late 2009, the aircraft has not flown again since. Currently XR537 performs only taxi runs but, let's hope the former Red Arrows plane will return to the air soon.
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Pierre Taquet©) (Anthony Graulus©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 
Folland Gnat T.Mk1 (G-RORI * c/n FL549)
Construction Number FL549, was built by Folland at their Hamble factory in early 1963 and first flew on June 21st, 1963. It was accepted into RAF service on July 31st, 1963 and serving at RAF Valley with No4 Flying Training School (FTS) until March 11th, 1979, having completed 16 years of instructional service with the RAF.
The XR 538 alias G-RORI is painted in No 4 FTS colours, representing the crucial role that the aircraft played in the training of so many fast jet pilots. The paint scheme is the red and white high visibility of the RAF training aircraft in the 1970's.
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 
 
The elegant Folland Gnat line
(Anthony Graulus©)
Simply fantastic to see those preserved jets
(Pierre Taquet©)
From Gnat to Provost
(Pierre Taquet©)
And the Jet Provost line
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 
 
BAC Jet Provost T.5P (G-VIVM * c/n PAC/W/23907)
XS230 is actually the prototype T.5 model. It was built as the penultimate Jet Provost T.4 for the RAF, but it was retained by British Aircraft Corporation and converted on the production line to T.5 specification. It first flew from Warton on February 28th, 1967, and was issued to the Empire Test Pilots School based at Boscombe Down later that year. Its stay with the unit only lasted a year, before moving onto the strength of Aircraft and Armament Experimental Establishment, also based at Boscombe, in June 1968. It remained in service with the MoD at the Wiltshire base for the next 25 years, making its last military flight on July 14th, 1993 before being officially retired in 1994.
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 
Percival Hunting Jet Provost T.3 (G-BKOU * c/n PAC/W/13901)
The XN637 was built by Hunting-Percival at Luton, and after flight tests was declared ready for acceptance on August 31st, 1961. It was ferried from Luton to RAF Shawbury on September 7th where it went to 27MU, for final preparations. On October 5th, 1961 the XN637 was issued to No 3 Flying Training School (3FTS), based at RAF Leeming in Yorkshire. The XN637 remained in service, latterly as aircraft number '13', until January 1963 when it returned to RAF Shawbury for storage. It stayed mothballed with 27MU for nearly ten years until November 11th, 1972 when the plane was moved to RAF Kemble for further storage, this time with 5MU.
On February 14th, 1973 XN637 was officially declared as Non Effective Airframe (NEA), and within a month it had been struck off charge. Originally destined for fire fighting practice, the jet moved instead to Winterbourne Gunner where it became part of the Nuclear Bacteriological and Chemical Defence Centre fleet of instructional airframes. Sold to civilian market in 1978.
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Pierre Taquet©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 
Percival Hunting Jet Provost T.3A (G-BWOT * c/n PAC/W/10138)
Built by Hunting Percival as T.3A model, the XN459 was delivered to the RAF in 1961. Sadly many information's are missing about it's military carreer.
Between March 25th, 1996 and October 20th, 1997 the XN459 was owned by Transair Ltd and got the civil registration G-BWOT. Afterward the plane was bought by Quasi Mondi Ltd. In July 2000 the aircraft was acquired by Red Pelicans Formation Ltd. Red Pelicans Formation Ltd became Red Pelicans Ltd in April 2002 and conserved the plane until May 2008. The next owner was Mohan Soor and in September 2008 the XN459 got is current 'Red Pelicans' colours. When the plane got to another unknown owner in October 2012, the Civil registration G-BWOT was cancelled. Finally the XN459 was bought by Kennet Aviation, North Weald and the registration was reactivated.
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Pierre Taquet©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 
Percival Hunting Jet Provost T.3A (G-BWDS * c/n PAC/W/9231)
The XM424 was built at Luton and was delivered to the RAF in April 1960, going initially to 27MU (Maintenance Unit) at RAF Shawbury for final preparations prior to service. A month later, XM424 was delivered to RAF Little Rissington, where it entered service with the CFS (Central Flying School) as aircraft 'R-K'. On April 16th, 1961, XM424 suffered a flying accident, sustaining Cat.3 damage in the resulting impact but, a team from 71MU were later sent to repair the aircraft. After 10 months off flying duties, XM424 was restored to the CFS fleet in February 1962. In July 1963, the aircraft was re-coded '72', and retained these markings for the remainder of its stay at Little Rissington.
On 20th August 1970, XM424 was transferred onto the strength of newly re-formed 6FTS (Flying Training School) at RAF Finningley. It remained in service, as aircraft 'W', with the School until April 1971, when it was moved to RAF Cranwell as part of the RAFC (Royal Air Force College) Jet Provost inventory, XM424 was kept busy on training tasks as aircraft '46' for the next four years. On December 17th, 1974 XM424 was ferried to the British Aircraft Corporation's Warton factory, for conversion to T.3A specification. Flight test was held in March 1975, and the aircraft returned to service a month later, joining the 3FTS based at RAF Leeming. This period of service only lasted 10 months, as the aircraft was ferried to RAF Kemble in February 1976, and placed in long term store with 5MU. In 1982 5MU began work to prepare the aircraft for re-entry into service, but it did not get issued to any Unit. Then in 1983, following the closure of RAF Kemble, XM424 was moved to RAF Shawbury for further hibernation. It's return to service finally arrived on August 30th, 1984. XM424 was flown out of RAF Shawbury to join 1FTS, based at Linton-on-Ouse. Flying as aircraft '30', it was kept busy continuously on training duties for the next two years. In June 1986 1FTS loaned XM424 to RAF St Athan, where it was used by the Station Flight as a ferry aircraft for the pilots, a kind of luxury taxi. Aircraft was back in service at Linton-on-Ouse by the beginning of July 1986. In 1992, the aircraft was selected as the RAF Jet Provost display aircraft, and for this role it received a special colour scheme. This included the name of its pilot, Flt. Lt. Steve Howard underneath the cockpit, and the Yorkshire rose applied on the jet intake.
XM424 was subsequently seen at several events both in the UK and in Europe. It continued in its training role until 1993, when it was retired from service.
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Pierre Taquet©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 
BAC Jet Provost T.5 (G-BWSG * c/n EEP/JP/988)
The XW324 was built at Warton as the 38th Jet Provost T.5 for the Royal Air Force. It was accepted by the RAF in early 1970 and went into service with 3FTS at RAF Leeming. Coded '38' the aircraft was used for basic pilot training, and also was used by the School's aerobatics team 'Gemini Pair' during the 1973 season.
The aircraft was not selected for upgrade to T.5A status during 1975, and instead it was transferred onto the strength of 6FTS at RAF Finningley. Used for navigational training tasks as aircraft 'U', XW324 remained at Finningley for the remainder of its RAF career. It was retired and ferried to RAF Shawbury for storage on July 21st, 1993. Sold to the civilian market in 1994.
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 
BAC Jet Provost T.5A (G-BWGF * c/n EEP/JP/989)
The XW325 was delivered to the Royal Air Force on Septembre 29th, 1970. The XW325 spent the majority of her service career at RAF Finningley as a NavEx trainer. After sale by the RAF XW325 was purchased by Global aviation and transferred to Humberside Airport, where she was civilianised and issued with a CAA Permit to Fly. After several owners XW325 was purchased by NEWMAC and hangared and is now maintained by Horizon Aircraft Services at MoD St Athan. XW325 has recently been repainted into her original 6FTS marking's.
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Pierre Taquet©)
 
(Serge Van Heertum©)
BAC 167 Strikemaster Mk.82A (G-SOAF * c/n 425) 1986
Royal Saudi Air Force colours
(Serge Van Heertum©)
BAC 167 Strikemaster Mk.80A (G-RSAF * c/n EEP/JP/3687) 1974
Sultan of Oman's Air Force colours
(Serge Van Heertum©)

#1 (Anthony Graulus©) - #2 (Pierre Taquet©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Anthony Graulus©)
 
Other Static display and Special Guest
 
Bell UH-1H Iroquois (G-HUEY * c/n 13560) 1973
Ex-Argentine Army s/n AE-413, captured during the Falklands War of 1982
(Anthony Graulus©)
 
Westland Puma HC.2 (XW224 * c/n 1166) 1972
The XW224 was built as HC.1 model in 1972. A large upgrade program was applied to 24 remaining airframes, providing them with the Makila 1A1 turboshaft of the Super Puma, advanced digital avionics and more fuel capacity, among other significant changes. Eurocopter undertook the work, having taken design responsibility from Aerospatiale, delivering the first Puma HC.Mk 2 back to RAF Benson for operational trials in 2013. This helicopter type is now the responsibility of Airbus Helicopters.  RAF crews immediately appreciated its radically improved performance and the broad situational awareness provided by its avionics, especially when the Puma returned to full operational service in 2015.  It remains a key support helicopter asset with 33 and 230 Sqns, both of them long-term Puma operators, and the unusual 28 Sqn, which flies the Puma and Chinook as the support helicopter OCU. The XW224 wear currently a Special "Tiger" paint scheme linked to 230 Squadron RAF Benson.
(Serge Van Heertum©)

(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)

(Serge Van Heertum©) 230 Sqn "Tiger" and 33 Sqn "Deer" - And it was a funny crew this day
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 
North Weald usual air trafic
 
(Anthony Graulus©)
 Socata TB-20 Trtinidad (PH-FCF * c/n 957)
(Pierre Taquet©)
Stoddard-Hamilton Glasair II-S RG (G-IIRG * c/n PFA 149-11937)
(Pierre Taquet©)
Vans RV-4 (G-ORCA * c/n PFA 181-12924)
(Pierre Taquet©)
Vans RV-7 (G-RVDB * c/n PFA 323-14526)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Piper PA-28R-200 Cherokee Arrow (G-AXCA * c/n 28R-35053)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Cessna 172P Skyhawk (G-BYEA * c/n 172-75464)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Agusta AW-109SP Grand New (G-PIFZ * c/n 22355)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Owner is Alba Aviation from Wycombe
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Leonardo AW-169 (G-HHEM * c/n 69049)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Owner is Specialist Aviation Services Limited 
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Eurocopter EC-135T-2 (G-POLH * c/n 0204)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Eurocopter EC-135T-2 (G-POLF * c/n 0267)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Police & Crime Commissioner for West Yorkshire
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Eurocopter-Kawasaki EC-145 (BK-117C-2) (G-MPSA * c/n 9065)
(Pierre Taquet©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Anthony Graulus©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Anthony Graulus©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 
Jet Fest 19 activities
 
Scottish Aviation Bulldog T.1 former RAF XX621
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Scottish Aviation Bulldog T.1 (G-CBEF * c/n BH120/286) 1974
(Pierre Taquet©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Scottish Aviation Bulldog T.1 former RAF XX549
(Pierre Taquet©)
Scottish Aviation Bulldog T.1 (G-CBID * c/n BH.120/242) 1974
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 
Hunting Percival Jet Provost T.3A XM424 in action
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Pierre Taquet©)
(Pierre Taquet©) (Anthony Graulus©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Anthony Graulus©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 
Bell UH-1H Iroquois G-HUEY in action
(Anthony Graulus©)
(Pierre Taquet©) (Pierre Taquet©)
(Pierre Taquet©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 
Westland Puma HC.2 XW224 in action
(Anthony Graulus©)

(Serge Van Heertum©) #1 (Anthony Graulus©) - #2 (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Anthony Graulus©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
  
Folland Gnat T.Mk1 XR538 in action
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Pierre Taquet©) (Pierre Taquet©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Anthony Graulus©)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 
 
A nice and colorful jet line to conclude. Waiting the next edition and let's hope to have more jet in action at that time.
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 

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