Text: Jan de Clercq - Pictures: Jan de Clercq, Serge Van Heertum & Others as mentioned
Copyright sbap 2019©
    
Nörvenich Airbase in the Nordrhein-Westfalen state
(Google earth)
Nörvenich and TLG31 History:
Nörvenich Air Base (ETNN) is a German Air Force Base situated in the Nordrhein-Westfalen state and is the home town of the
"Taktisches Luftwaffengeschwader 31", also named "Boelcke", formely know n as Jagdbombergeschwader 31.
The 31 Squadron flies with the Eurofighter Typhoon.
The wing was raised during 1957 on Büchel Airbase as Nörvenich Airbase had not been readied yet.
Nörvenich Air Base was build for the RAF Germany in 1952. In 1958, the Jagdbombergeschwader 31 based at Nörvenich, was the first German Wing to use the U.S.-built Republic F-84F Thunderstreak.
On October 1st, 1957 the first Squadron of the Wing was officially activated making it the oldest squadron still in service with the German Air Force.
During January 1958 the wing began its move to Nörvenich and on June 20th, 1958 the wing was officially activated there.
On January19th, 1959 Jagdbombergeschwader 31 became the first German Air Force Wing to be assigned to NATO.
On April 20th,  1961 the wing was given the name "Boelcke", in honor of the World War I Luftstreitkräfte fighter pilot Oswald Boelcke.
Initially equipped with Republic F-84F Thunderstreak fighters, the wing received Lockheed F-104G / TF-104G Starfighters starting in 1961 and became the first operational air force Starfighter wing on June 20th, 1962.
With the introduction of the Panavia Tornado IDS in 1979 the Jagdbombergeschwader 31 again was the first unit to switch to the new plane.
In 1983, 31 Staffel exchanged his Starfighter for the Panavia consortium aircraft, the "Tornado".
When the air force began fielding its newest combat plane the Eurofighter Typhoon JaBoG 31 again became the first unit to proceed the transition to the new plane.
The first four Eurofighters arrived at Nörvenich on December 16th, 2009. The last variable geometry aircraft Tornado left the TLG 31 in June 2010; Since then the Wing became the first operational on Eurfighter and currently a total of 31 Eurfighters are based at Nörvenich.
   
Emblem: 31.2 JABO Alma (1958 - 1961) Emblem: TLG 31 Boëlcke (1961 - Current)
  
Oswald Boelke (Giebichstein, 19 mai 1891 - Bapaume, 28 octobre 1916 ), the father of modern air combat
(Web archives)
Republic F-84F Thunderstreak metal finish with the "big" Jabo insigna
DA-242 (c/n 53-7119)
(Coll Denis Eusicom)
Republic F-84F Thunderstreak from Jobo 31 in NATO camouflage
DA-378 (c/n 53-6998)
(Coll Denis Eusicom)
Lockheed F-104G Starfighter 26+05 (c/n 683-9130)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
The 20+50 and 23+87 in flight (c/n 683-2058 & c/n 683-8094)
(Archives Luftwaffe - DR)
Panavia Tornado IDS 44+00 (GS-067) at Florennes during a TLP session
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Panavia Tornado IDS 44+21 (GS-083) ready for take off at Florennes
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Panavia Tornado IDS-T 44+72 (GT-044) landing at Koksijde Airbase
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Panavia Tornado IDS 45+45 (GS-193) Take Off from Kleine Brogel
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 

The visit of this German Airbase started with a technical briefing about the latest type of Eurofighter Typhoon in the registry, known as a Tranche 3, represents a major stepping stone in the evolution of one of the world's leading combat aircraft.
The Tranche 3 standard embodies a number of "under the skin" changes that effectively future proof the aircraft and make it more attractive to current and potential export customers.
Taken together there have been hundreds of modifications, changes and an addition which effectively means Typhoon has now taken a massive step forward.
Under the Tranche 3A contract signed in 2009, a total of 112 aircraft have been ordered for the four European partner nations of Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK, with 40 aircraft bound for the Royal Air Force.

   
The first Tranche 3 aircraft (BS116)
(BAe Systems - Media©)
During static trials at Warton facilities
(BAe Systems - Media©)
  

The first Tranche 3 Eurofighter Typhoon made its first flight in the U.K. on December 2, when BS116/ZK355, took off from BAE Systems' Warton facility. They are set to be the most advanced versions of the Typhoon and are equipped to provide more electrical power in preparation for the installation of the planned E-Scan radar, as well as the ability to potentially fit conformal fuel tanks on top of the rear fuselage.
Enhancements include provision for conformal fuel tanks and extra electrical power and cooling for an E-Scan radar which will enhance performance, reliability and availability whilst delivering lower support costs for Typhoon customers.
Extra computing power and high speed data network systems will give the aircraft capacity for even more capability in the future. The aircraft ESM/ECM enhancements have been focused on improving radiating jamming power with antenna modifications, while EuroDASS is reported to offer a range of new capabilities, including the addition of a digital receiver, extending band coverage to low frequencies (VHF/UHF) and introducing an interferometric receiver with extremely precise geolocation functionalities.
On the jamming side, EuroDASS is looking to low-band (VHF/UHF) jamming, more capable antennas, new ECM techniques, while protection against missiles is to be enhanced through a new passive MWS in addition to the active devices already on board the aircraft. The latest support for self-protection will however originate from the new Active Electronic Scanned Array (AESA) radar which is to replace the Captor system, providing in a spiraled program with passive, active and cyberwarfare RF capabilities.
Mark Kane, BAE Systems Managing Director - Combat Air said: "For casual observers the aircraft is little changed from its sleek predecessor but it has a number of provisions that will allow it to take on additional capability in the future".

 
The armament panel of the Typhoon
(BAe Systems - Media©)
The different possible loading in function of the missions
(BAe Systems - Media©)
The defensive points of the Typhoon
(BAe Systems - Media©)
(BAe Systems - Media©)
 

After the technical briefing, the next step was a photo shooting along the taxiway to immortalize the operational missions of the day. Before the start up and taxi, the SAR Huey took off with some others rotary wings present at Nörvenich. The Huey becomes a rare helicopter and is almost an historic helicopter. Just in time to move to the good place and the first Eufi's were already taking off.
Sadly two aircraft aborted their take off due to technical problems, safety first!
After the operational missions, it was possible to immortalize some historical gate guardian, the wonderful Blue Tornado and a TF-104G Starfighter.
Andto conclude the present report, a visit was also held to the maintenance instruction hangar, were students are learning the job to become aircraft technical specialists. This hangar devoted to the technical instruction is the home of some former Luftwaffe glories.

 
Airbus Helicopter H120 (D-HSHB) Bundespolizei
(Jan de Clercq©)
Airbus Helicopter H145 / EC145T2 (D-HYAF)
ADAC (Allgemeine Deutsche Automobil-Club)
(Jan de Clercq©)
Bell UH-1D Iroquois (71+69 - c/n 8229) detached from THR 30
(Jan de Clercq©)
Bell UH-1D Iroquois (70+89 - c/n 8149) detached from THR 30
(Jan de Clercq©)
Eurofighter EF2000(T) (30+99 - GT023) on taxi
(Jan de Clercq©)
Ongoing for the next training mission
(Jan de Clercq©)
Take off...
(Jan de Clercq©)
...and gear up
(Jan de Clercq©)
Eurofighter EF2000 (31+29 - GS0089) on the way to the holding point
(Jan de Clercq©)
The pilot in his office
(Jan de Clercq©)
Power take off
(Jan de Clercq©)
Heading the skies
(Jan de Clercq©)
Eurofighter EF2000 (31+99 - GS0109)
(Jan de Clercq©)
A beautiful day for training missions
(Jan de Clercq©)
Low level take off
(Jan de Clercq©)
Powerful like a Typhoon
(Jan de Clercq©)
In the heat of the Eurojet EJ-200
(Jan de Clercq©)
Back to base, mission accomplished
(Jan de Clercq©)
Eurofighter EF2000 (30+81 - GS0061)
(Jan de Clercq©)
A camouflage that goes well with the loaded sky
(Jan de Clercq©)
Eurofighter EF2000 (31+17 - 178/AS010)
(Jan de Clercq©)
Heavy concentration
(Jan de Clercq©)
Short final
(Jan de Clercq©)
Close up on the 31+17
(Jan de Clercq©)
31+45 in final
(Jan de Clercq©)
31+29 on landing
(Jan de Clercq©)
High turn after downwind
(Jan de Clercq©)
Eurofighter EF2000 (31+41 - GS0101)
(Jan de Clercq©)
Nose close up
(Jan de Clercq©)
Eurofighter EF2000 (31+45 - GS0105)
(Jan de Clercq©)
Other view of the 31+45
(Jan de Clercq©)
Right side this time
(Jan de Clercq©)
Some touch and go
(Jan de Clercq©)
Eurofighter EF2000 (31+48 - GS0108)
(Jan de Clercq©)
Few seconds before landing
(Jan de Clercq©)
The underside of the Typhoon
(Jan de Clercq©)
One more approach
(Jan de Clercq©)
Landing...
(Jan de Clercq©)
...back to base
(Jan de Clercq©)
Follow the runway lights
(Jan de Clercq©)
Mission accomplished
(Jan de Clercq©)
 
Nörvenich Wrecks and Relics
 
Panavia Tornado IDS (44+31 - GS092) "Blue lightning" 45 years TLG31
(Jan de Clercq©)
Info's about the "Blue lightning"
(Jan de Clercq©)
Lockheed TF-104G (29+19 - c/n 5073)
(Jan de Clercq©)
Into the TSLw1 instructional hangar: Lockheed F-104G (21+69 - c/n 7038)
(Jan de Clercq©)
Panavia Tornado IDS (43+34 - GS014)
(Jan de Clercq©)
Dornier Do28D2 (58+41 - c/n 4116)
(Jan de Clercq©)
Messerschmitt-Bölkow-Blohm Bo105P1 (86+99 - c/n 6099)
(Jan de Clercq©)
Aerospatial SE3130 Alouette II (75+12 - c/n 1257/C10)
(Jan de Clercq©)
Aerospatial SE3130 Alouette II (75+51 - c/n 1391/C178)
(Jan de Clercq©)
 
SBAP would like to warmly thank the authorities of the Luftwaffe, but also the authorities and staff of Nörvenich Airbase for the facilities and the warm welcome offered during our stay.
 
 

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