Text: Serge Van Heertum - Pictures: Serge Van Heertum, Pierre Taquet, Anthony Graulus & Bruno Ghils
Translation: Marc Arys   © sbap 2017
 

At the beginning of August, the Shuttleworth Collection organized its 4th big event of the season, named: Edwardian Pageant.
The Edwardian period lasted from 1901 to 1910, with reference to King Edward VII who reigned at that time.
However, historically speaking, this period was originated from the late 1890's unto the beginning of the First World War.
So, during the morning of the event, held on the always beautiful grounds of Old Warden, you could run into gentlemen and their delightful ladies wearing era outfits, rendering the atmosphere of that period in present days. In addition to these beautiful outfits, there were also means of locomotion presented to the visitors. Starting with the roots of the transport of that time, I named the bicycle. There were more modern means of transport on view, such as a horse towed firefighter vehicle and of course some cars and trucks dating back to the period before the First World War.
The afternoon airshow was once again a great one. Sadly, no aircraft of that period took to the air because of the windy condition, and we can understand the organizers who did not want to risk such fragile machines.
But on show, a pleiad of biplane aircraft of the First War era as well as some aircraft of the collection like the "Comet", the "Mew Gull ", the Blackburn B2 and other Lysander.
Some guests were also present, like Anna Walker and her Bücker, the Breitling Wingwalkers team and the culminating part of the show, the "Red Arrows", closing this fantastic day at Shuttleworth. One more you will say... Well yes, Shuttleworth remains a must, even if it is not a festival of jets!
As words never will replace images, let's go for the Edwardian Pageant Airshow...
SBAP Team would like to thanks warmly all the Shuttleworth collection members and particularly Mrs Ciara Harper from the media team for welcoming us and give us again a fantastic display.

 
 (Compilation: Serge Van Heertum© - Pierre Taquet© - Bruno Ghils©) 
 
The atmosphere of the day...
 







Beautiful cars, full English breakfast, siesta before the show, children entertainment, pilots, test flights and visitor aircraft...This is Shuttleworth!
(Compilation: Serge Van Heertum© - Pierre Taquet© - Anthony Graulus© - Bruno Ghils©) 
 
The personality of the day...
 
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 

Anna Walker was born in Brazil and like many Brazilians she has a multinational background with Brazilian/Italian Danish/British grandparents.
She was introduced to flying at the age of 6, by her father who is a private fixed wing, helicopter and glider pilot. Gliding from the age of 13, she took up power flying as a tug pilot and also experimented with hang-gliding in its early days.
She started racing go-karts at 14 with her younger brother Johnnie Walker, winning several state and national competitions. At 18 she turned to rallying becoming a professional racing driver at 19 and competed successfully for three seasons in saloon cars and single-seaters for Fiat and Formula VW teams. Anna stopped racing professionally to join the family's civil engineering business. She worked as an apprentice in an offshore rig building yard acquiring qualifications which enabled her to leave Brazil and go to work abroad. In London she concluded her Business Studies which eventually led to a job in the City, followed by a career in international trade and in the shipping industry.
Anna started flying in the UK in 1985. She joined the famous Tiger Club at Redhill in 1988 where she undertook aerobatic, display and formation training. Anna also flew with the Diamond Nine Team and participated in the Famous Grouse Moth Rally with her first airplane, a Tiger Moth.
She won her first aerobatic competition in 1992 in a Bücker Jungmann followed by winning 3 out of 4 competitions entered.
These titles facilitated her entry into the display world and Anna specialized in dynamic solo aerobatic displays in her Bücker Jungmann. She is also frequently invited to display The Fighter Collection's Bücker Jungmeister as part part of the Flying Legends warbirds airshows at Duxford, home of the Imperial War Museum.
Anna holds a CAA Display Authorization which entitles her to do low level aerobatics and formation displays. In 2000 she finally achieved one of her lifetime ambitions by becoming a Commercial Pilot. Her first job as a full time professional display pilot was to display a Pitts S2-B sponsored by One-2-One, the mobile telephone company.
With over two thousand flying hours in 40 different types of aircraft including floatplanes, Anna Walker also holds a French Mountain Pilot's License. For the past 14 years she has been landing a Piper Super Cub equipped with skis on glaciers in the Alps. The highest landing was at 14,500ft just below the summit of Mont-Blanc. In 2001 Anna founded Skytricks, an aerial advertising business based in England. Working with a team of select performers and exciting airplanes, the company runs sponsored airplanes for advertising and corporate entertainment. Skytricks also provides banner towing, stunt flying and aerial film coordination, air-to-air photography and aerobatic coaching.

 

 A great and charming pilot!   (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 CASA 1-131E Jungmann   (Serge Van Heertum©) Spanish version of the Bücker 131 built in 1954   (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©)  (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Anthony Graulus©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Anthony Graulus©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Pierre Taquet©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©)
 
The Edwardian Pageant Airshow
 
 Caldus Gyrocopter by Peter Davies
(Serge Van Heertum©)
(Pierre Taquet©) (Pierre Taquet©)
 Percival P.56 Provost T.1 (1950)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Pierre Taquet©) (Pierre Taquet©)
Slingsby T.6 Kirby Kite (1937)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 De Havilland Canada DHC-1 Chipmunk 22 (1949)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 De Havilland DH.51 Moth "Miss Kenya" (1924) - Miles M.14 Magister (1937) - Avro 621 Tutor (1931)
(Pierre Taquet©)
 (Pierre Taquet©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Anthony Graulus©) (Pierre Taquet©)
 (Pierre Taquet©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 The "Tiger Nine" formation (De Havilland DH.82A Tiger Moth)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Bruno Ghils©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Bruno Ghils©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 G-ANKZ (c/n 3803 from 1938) - G-ASPV (c/n 84167 from 1941) - G-AHOO (c/n 86149 from 1943)
 G-ANEN (c/n 85418 from 1942) - G-AXXV (c/n 85852 from 1944) - G-AHAN (c/n 86553 from 1944)
 G-APLU (c/n 85094 from 1941) - G-ACDA (c/n 3175 from 1934) - G-AOBX (c/n 83653 from 1940)
(Pictures: 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 8 - 9 Serge Van Heertum© / 6 - 7 Pierre Taquet©)
 Weltland Lysander MkIII (1938)
(Anthony Graulus©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Pierre Taquet©)
 (Pierre Taquet©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 Polikarpov PO2 (1944)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 
Special Focus on the Breitling Wingwalkers
 

The Breitling Wingwalkers team still offers a strong and impressive show. This style of demonstration dates back from between the two world war periods when the former military pilots had to recycle themselves to continue their passion: flying. This phenomenon originated in the United States where spectators were fool of aerial fairs. Currently, the principle has remained the same, but the safety standards are well present. In addition to the spectacular aspect, you should know that the charming ladies who are walking on the wings are in fact great sportswomen who train intensely to maintain their fysical fitness, much needed to ensure this magical show.

A little bit of history:

In 1918 an American flier called Ormer Locklear came up with a stunt that was guaranteed to wow the crowds: he would climb out of the airplane and walk along the wing, even climbing from one airplane onto another. Apparently Locklear first clambered out of the cockpit to fix a technical problem while training during the war. A normal person would have landed and then sorted out the problem.
Pretty soon you couldn't operate a flying circus that didn't have a wing walking act and Locklear was soon joined by numerous other daredevils including the wonderfully named Ethal Dare, the world's first female wing walker, who like Locklear, would walk from plane to plane.
Not surprisingly there were some mishaps. Ormer himself came a cropper while working on a film.
These wing walk pioneers were operating without a safety net: no parachutes, no safety wires tethering them to the aircraft. A slip of the foot and it was the high dive for our brave showman or showgirl. In 1938 the authorities in America decided that parachutes had to be worn though by that time war was on its way and the show was about to close anyway.
Flying changed after the war. There were new goals like breaking the sound barrier, space exploration and the development of quiet, fast and comfortable airliners so that we could all go on foreign holidays relatively cheaply. In other words we'd got used to flying and some of the magic had gone out of it. There were still airshows with amazing displays of flying skills and some truly incredible modern jet fighter aircraft shattering greenhouse windows on high-speed fly pasts. But a little bit of the between-the-wars glamour had gone out of it.
But those barnstorming days of the 20's and 30's and the characters who manned the flying circuses hadn't been forgotten by those with a deep love of flying and a passion for its history. A few wing walking teams operated in America in the 1970's but it wasn't until frustrated barnstormer Vic Norman founded his famous Aerosuperbatics Wing Walking team in the early 1980's that the sight of dare devils hand standing and flying upside down on the wing was seen in Europe.
Yes, the wing walkers are safely tethered to their Boeing Stearman biplanes, but the glamour, spectacle, sounds and atmosphere is just the same as it was when young and brave Ormer Locklear went for a dramatic 10 ft stroll along the wing of his warplane in 1918.

The Wingwalkers of the day:
Gina Marshall, nickname:"G-Force"
Katie Hobbs, nickname: "Shockwave"
Both are in their first season into the team

The pilots:
Martyn Carrington
David Barrell

 
 (Compilation: Serge Van Heertum© - Pierre Taquet© - Anthony Graulus© - Bruno Ghils©) 
 Blackburn B2 serie 1 (1936) - Auster J1 Autocrat (1945) - Auster AOP6 (1947)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Anthony Graulus©) (Anthony Graulus©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Pierre Taquet©)
 (Anthony Graulus©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Pierre Taquet©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 De Havilland DH.90A Dragonfly (1937) - De Havilland DH.89A Dominie (1941)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Pierre Taquet©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Pierre Taquet©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
(Serge Van Heertum©)  (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 De Havilland DH.88 "Comet" (1934) & Percival Mew Gull (1934)
(Pierre Taquet©)
 (Anthony Graulus©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Pierre Taquet©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Pierre Taquet©) (Pierre Taquet©)
 The First World War
(Serge Van Heertum©)
Sopwith Dove (1920)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Anthony Graulus©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
Royal Aircraft Factory SE5A (1917)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Anthony Graulus©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 Bristol F2.b Fighter (1917)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Pierre Taquet©) (Pierre Taquet©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 Sopwith 7F.1 Snipe (1917)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Anthony Graulus©) (Pierre Taquet©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 Royal Aircraft Factory Be.2c (1914)
(Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Anthony Graulus©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 Bristol Scout Type C (1914)
(Pierre Taquet©)
 (Anthony Graulus©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Pierre Taquet©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 Xtra 300SC by Mark Jefferies and his little RC brother
(Anthony Graulus©)
 (Anthony Graulus©) (Serge Van Heertum©)

 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Anthony Graulus©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©)
 The Royal Air Force "Red Arrows" aerobatic team
(Serge Van Heertum©)
N°1 - N°2  (Serge Van Heertum©) - N°3 (Bruno Ghils©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Anthony Graulus©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Anthony Graulus©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Pierre Taquet©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Bruno Ghils©) (Bruno Ghils©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©) (Serge Van Heertum©)

 (Serge Van Heertum©) N°1 (Serge Van Heertum©) - N°2 (Anthony Graulus©)
 (Pierre Taquet©) (Anthony Graulus©)
 (Bruno Ghils©) (Anthony Graulus©)
 (Serge Van Heertum©)

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