Text: Serge Van Heertum - Pictures: SBAP team as mentioned - Translation: Marc Arys   © sbap 2017
   
  (© Alain Debras)

On April 11 and 12, the Belgian Air Component organized their Helidays at the Beauvechain airbase. Organized during the spring school holidays, the first day was dedicated to the arrivals of the various participating aircraft and this was also the occasion, as is being done more and more, to have a "Spottersday". This latter let the passionate have access, for a little fee, allowing them literally to "shoot" rotary wings in action.
The second day focused on the general public, so everyone could have acces to the base and in doing so, admire at will the various displayed machines. This was also the occasion for the visitors to witness a combined demonstration with, besides the Air Component, the US Army and Special Forces Group, which, do not forget, celebrates its 75 years of existence. Everyone had the leisure to visit the different booths and gather numerous explanations and information's.

25 years ago Belgium acquired 46 Agusta A109BA. This acquisition was bespoken widely throughout the media and brought politico-financial scandals, which for some among us are still in our memories. But, we will not come back on all the ins and outs of this controversial purchase. The only thing we can report on is the general satisfaction emphasized by the A109 pilot community. A reliable helicopter indeed, but not a big war machine.
This anniversary was not really highlighted during the Helidays, setting aside an article published in the program of the day which the visitors had the leisure to buy.
Parallel to this, somewhat discrete anniversary, it is important to emphasize that since September 01, 2016, the Air Component maintains an armed A109 on alert, 24/7, which can be airborne within 15 minutes. Its mission is the interception of light airplanes, with radio failure or not following the original flight plan or drones, causing security or safety issues.
Called QRH - "Quick Reaction Helicopter" - this concept is a complement to the F-16AM fighters, which ensure the protection of the National airspace and more recently, the Benelux airspace, alternating with the Dutch Koninklijke Luchtmacht.
This Agusta is on stand-by at Beauvechain airbase, where about 13 A109 are based. These helicopters were delivered between January 1992 and February 1994. In fine, the restructuration plans of the Belgian Defence, disclosed about a year ago, reported on maintaining a fleet of only eight A109.
To ensure its mission of "sky guardian", the helicopter is equipped with two 7,62 mm machine guns, mounted into the side doors, and manned by one "gunner".
The mission was entrusted to the 17th Squadron, the only squadron still flying this Italian helicopter, which will be alerted regarding the necessities and only after a thorough information gathering by the Control and Reporting Center (CRC) at Glons. The CRC will ascertain the degree of emergency for an interception and whether or not the interception mission will go ahead.

According to the organizers, this event was a real success, as about 11.000 visitors were counted during the public day on Wednesday.
The main goal of the event focused on the encounter between the visitors and the military to allow them to share their passion for these uncommon crafts and perhaps arouse some vocations among the youngsters. The aircrafts certainly staying the most attractive of them all...
This day was successfully concluded, which can only be positively noted by the organizers towards future similar events.
All the SBAP team members present during those two days invite you to wander around at Beauvechain airbase through their images.
Let us hope that for the next editions, the specialized press, which we claim being part of, will not be put aside as it was during this present edition. Only our passion for the aeronautical world and press reports moved us to give you this page. It was also the occasion for some of our team members to get together during an event and to share, within this passionate world, our friendship and our professionalism... yes, indeed!

 
 Aerial view of the event (Courtesy: © Michael Moors ComOpsAir IPR)
Participants
 

The helicopter squadron 3/67 Parisis is a French Air Force helicopter unit based on the BA 107 of Villacoublay in Paris region.
3/67 was created at its current base of Villacoublay on October 1st, 1964. The unit tooks the name "Parisis" again from the former Fighter Squadron 1/10 "Parisis". Its insignia, Pegasus, was taken from the former SPA 99. Alouette II and Alouette III equipped squadron. The squadron was essentially a logistical support unit of the Second Air Region, but also for other staffs stationed at Villacoublay and in Ile-de-France (Taverny , Paris-Victor, Bretigny). It also supports the helicopter detachment set up in the 6st and 43rd BIMa. (Bataillon d'Infanterie de Marine - Marine Infantry Battalion). In 1988, the famous "Baron Noir" case definitively directed the unit's activity towards a new mission: the MASA (Mesures Actives de Sécurité Aérienne - Active measures of aviation security) first of all with Alouette III equipped with a thermal camera, then with the newcomer, the AS555 Fennec.
From 1996 to 2005, following the dissolution of the GLAM (Groupe de liaisons aériennes ministérielles), the squadron was joined by an additional squadron equipped with three Super Pumas, dedicated to the transport of high state authorities. 
(Picture: © Serge van Oosterzee)

 (© Pierre Taquet) (© Serge Van Heertum)

This helicopter is owned by the HFWS (Heeresfliegerwaffenschule). This flying school was formed on July 1st, 1959 in Niedermendig. On January 13th, 1960 the unit moved and was stationed in Bückeburg-Achum. At the beginning, only tactical and Transport Helicopter Pilot courses were provided but as from 1962, Helicopter Basic training was also integrated. The unit was firstly equipped with the Alouette II and since 2000 also with Eurocopter EC 135 for the basic training. The Bell UH-1D, CH-53G and Bo 105 (M and P models) are foreseen for the advanced and tactical training. Since 2002 the unit is operating the Bo 105´s from Celle-Wietzenbruch airfield. Lehrguppe A (Training Group A, a batallion equivalent) was based at Achum for the flying courses, Lehrgruppe B for the military Training in Bückeburg Barracks. The Training Centrum C was based at Celle with the Heeresfliegerversuchsstaffel 910 (Army Aviation Test Squadron) for the development and testing of new tactics and equipment for the Army Aviation.The German Army Aviation School at Bueckeburg is also equipped with 12 CAE-built helicopter simulators. A state-of-the-art training facility and Europe largest helicopter training centre, including two Bell UH-1D, eight Airbus Helicopter EC135 T1, and two Sikorsky CH-53 helicopter simulators.
(Picture: © Serge van Oosterzee)

 (© Serge Van Heertum) (© Serge Van Heertum)

Currently MFG 5 uses one civil EC135 helicopter. DL Helicopter Technik is the owner and operates from the civil part of Nordholz. The Eurocopter is a temporary solution for providing basic helicopter training for new pilots. It is possible to learn new pilots the basics of helicopter flying without using expensive Lynx or Seaking hours. Compared to the Seaking one flight hour in the EC135 is approximately 17 times cheaper. This makes the Eurocopter a good alternative for flight training. The project is still a pilot project but the first results are promising. Probably the Navy will increase the amount of flight hours in the future.
(Picture: © Pierre Taquet)

 (© Serge Van Heertum) (© Alain Debras)

The Nordholz Airbase houses two naval squadrons in Germany known as "Marinefliegergeschwader" (MFG). The first one, MFG 3, operates all fixed wing aircraft and operates the airfield. MFG 3 is for example responsible for the fire brigade, air traffic control... MFG 5, the second squadron, operates the rotary wing aircraft and trains all flying and non-flying base personnel. For example, there are two full mission simulators on base for both the Orion and the Lynx. But MFG 5 gives the 1500 persons a year a sea survival training. The Seaking is one of the oldest helicopters in use. Currently there are 21 aircraft in active use but due to the age it is hard to keep them flying. The most important role of the Seaking is search and rescue (SAR) operations. There are permanently two helicopters stationed at the coast, one at Helgoland and one at Warnemünde. The Seaking is a large and very suitable machine for SAR missions. It´s a stable aircraft which can take a large amount of people. The helicopters are so worn out right now that, it is hard to fulfill all tasks. According to plan, the last aircraft will leave service in 2018-2020. The German Navy wants to replace the Seaking with 18 Airbus Helicopter NH-90.
(Picture: © Serge Van Heertum)

 (© Jacques Vincent) (© Pierre Taquet)
 (© Serge Van Heertum) (© Serge Van Heertum)
 (© Alain Debras) (© Anthony Graulus)

The AH-64 Apache was designed by Hughes in the mid seventies (McDonnell Douglas took over Hughes and even later in 1997 Boeing bought McDonnell Douglas). Designed in the ground attack and anti-tank role, the AH-64 is a twin engined helicopter, with a four bladed rotor. It has a gunner and a pilot as crew and is equipped with advanced systems. Main armament is the 30-mm M230 Chain Gun and missiles below the stubwings such as the AGM-114 Hellfire missile. The engines are the General Electric T700. It was named Apache in late 1981, and the first real production machine was delivered in 1983. Further improvement was envisaged and the usage of an advanced radar system on top of the rotor mast and a helmet mounted display, the "Integrated Helmet". This AH-64D was called the "Longbow" and the prototype flew in April 1992, but production started only after 1997. It received the T700-GE-701D engines, rated at 2,000 SHP. Stinger missiles can also be carried. Regarding the Dutch armed services (RNLAF), the AH-64 was purchased mid-nineties. A dozen AH-64A were leased for training, followed by the actual AH-64D. The Apaches of the RNLAF are equipped with an advanced Electronic Warfare self-protection system against Infra-Red (IR) missile threats. The first AH-64D Apache was delivered to the KLU in 1998 and is the first and only attack helicopter in service in The Netherlands. Six of them are on a permanent stay in the USA while others have been operated in Afghanistan, Eritrea and Mali. Along in history, the Klu deployed also Apaches to Djibouti, Bosnia and Herzegovina all as part of UN operations. Also, to the Multinational force in Iraq and in 2006 NATO forces in Afghanistan. As from 2012, 30 AH-64D are in Dutch service. But the Longbow radar was never in fact delivered to the KLu. 
(Picture: ©
Serge van Oosterzee)

 (© Serge Van Heertum) (© Anthony Graulus)
 (© Serge Van Heertum) (© Pierre Taquet)
  (© Pierre Taquet) Serge van Oosterzee)
 Serge van Oosterzee) Alain Debras)

The Mil Mi-35 is the export version of the Mi-24V helicopter of Russian production, manufactured by the Rostvertol Company based in Rostov on Don. The Czech Air Force took delivery of the Mi-35, with several of its upgrade packages. The 231 LtBVr (231 Squadron) of the 23ZVrL (23 Wing) is currently based at the military airfield of Prerov. The Unit operates the MIL Mi-35 Hind, one of the latest versions of this more than capable combat / transport Helicopter.
Established in 1995, when all Czech Hind squadrons where relocated to Prerov to form the 33rd Wing. 331 Squadron inherited the Traditions of the 1st Squadron / 51stRegiment. In 2001 the Prerov "Tigers" where officially accepted as a full member of the NATO Tiger Association, and won the Silver Tiger Trophy rewarded to the best crew during the annual NATO Tiger Meet) in 2002.
Due to some money saving re-structuring in the Czech Air Force 33 Wing was renumbered 23 Wing and 331 Sqn changed to 231 Sqn.
In 2008 231 Sqn moved from Prerov to Namest AB, and was relocated to the 22nd Wing, This transfer led to another change in designation from 231 Sqn to 221 Sqn. 
(Picture: © Serge Van Heertum)

 (© Pierre Taquet) (© Jacques Vincent)
 (© Pierre Taquet) (© Serge Van Heertum)
 (© Serge Van Heertum) (© Serge Van Heertum)

The Austrian Air Force helicopter fleet includes Agusta-Bell (AB) 204's (mainly used for medical evacuation), AB-206's (training and liaison), and AB-212's (used by air-mobile troops and for light transport). The French-made Alouette III was delivered in 1967 and remains available for search-and-rescue tasks, including high mountain operations. The Alouette II fleet is owned by the Verbindungshubschrauberstaffel (VeHSSta) based at Aigen im Ennstal. The Bell OH-58 Kiowa, a scout helicopter, is equipped with a rapid-firing machine gun, but the air force lacks a true attack helicopter. Most of the helicopters, except the AB-212's, are becoming obsolete. After the 1999 Galtür Avalanche, it became apparent that the Austrian Air Force's helicopter complement were to few in numbers and to limited in design. Therefore, several US built UH-60 Blackhawk helicopters were purchased, to be used for transportation during disasters.
(Picture: © Jacques Vincent)

 (© Anthony Graulus) (© Pierre Taquet)
 (© Serge Van Heertum) (© Jacques Vincent)
 (© Jacques Vincent) (© Alain Debras)
 (© Serge van Oosterzee) (© Jacques Vincent)

The 12th Combat Aviation Brigade is a United States Army unit. It was first organized as the 12th Aviation Group at Fort Benning, Georgia, on 18 June 1965. The unit deployed to Vietnam in August 1965. Between 1965 and 1966 the group doubled in size and was used to form the 1st Aviation Brigade in March 1966. Among its units in Vietnam were the 11th 13th, 145th, 210th, 214th, 222nd, 269th and 308th Aviation Battalions. The unit earned the Meritorious Unit Commendation, two Vietnamese Crosses for Gallantry with Palm, and the Vietnamese Civic Action Medal, First Class while in Vietnam.
Upon its return in March 1973, the 12th Aviation Group became a major subordinate command of the XVIII Airborne Corps, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. In November 1979, the 12th Aviation Group deployed to Lindsey Air Station, Wiesbaden, Germany as a major subordinate command of the V Corps, providing command and control of aviation units throughout the V Corps area of operation. In April 1984, Headquarters Company, 12th Aviation Group moved to Wiesbaden Air Base. In October 1987, under army-wide restructuring, the 12th Aviation Group was re-designated as the 12th Aviation Brigade, along with its subordinate units: 5th Battalion, 158thAviation Regiment; C Company, 7thBattalion, 158th Aviation Regiment; and B Company, 6thBattalion, 158th Aviation Regiment. In the latter part of 1988, the Brigade re-structured again when the 5th Squadron (AH 64), 6th Cavalry Regiment arrived in Europe.
In August 1990, the Brigade deployed to Southwest Asia for Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm with 2-3 Aviation Regiment (Attack) attached. During Desert Storm the Brigade provided a highly mobile and lethal maneuver force to the multi-national forces in Saudi Arabia. Initially attached to the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), the Brigade became a major subordinate command of XVIII Airborne Corps in January 1991. During the four-day coalition ground offensive, the Brigade flew nearly 400 flight hours, transporting 390 tons of cargo to forward deployed units and providing essential combat and combat support services for the ground offensive.
Since the end of the Cold War, the Brigade has played a major role in America's peacekeeping operations. From 1991 until 1996, 12th Brigade ensured the safety of Kurdish citizens during Operation Provide Comfort. The Brigade operated the Beirut Air Bridge from 1993 until 1998, providing a logistical lifeline to the US Embassy in Beirut from Cyprus. The Brigade also deployed soldiers to Hungary and Bosnia in 1995 to enforce the peace during Operations Joint Endeavor and Joint Guard.
In April 1999, the Brigade deployed to Tirana, Albania as part of Task Force Hawk in support of NATO Operation Allied Force. The Brigade Task Force consisted of 65 aircraft including UH-60 Black Hawks, CH-47 Chinooks, AH-64 Apaches, and UH-60 MEDEVAC aircraft. When peace was declared in June 1999, the Brigade transported elements of the 82nd Airborne Division into Macedonia and Kosovo.
After returning from Task Force Hawk and Task Force Falcon, 12thBrigade prepared for re-structuring and re-stationing initiatives. The USAREUR Movement Directive 5-00 directed all of the Aviation Brigade elements stationed at Wiesbaden Army Airfield to move to Giebelstadt Army Airfield.
In support of the Global War on Terror, the 12th Aviation Brigade conducted full spectrum combat operations during its year-long deployment to Operation Iraqi Freedom. The brigade flew thousands of hours, moved over 25,000 personnel, and controlled over 230,000 air movements. In February 2005 the 12th Aviation Brigade deployed to Afghanistan in support Operation Enduring Freedom and to Pakistan in support of International Earthquake Humanitarian Relief Operations.
On 20 March 2007 the 12th became a separate brigade under V Corps. Most recently, the 12th deployed to Iraq in the summer of 2007, organized as Task Force XII in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. In May 2012, the CAB deployed five of its seven battalions to Afghanistan, while at the same time sending one attack battalion, 3-159th ARB, to Kuwait to support Operation Spartan Shield in the Persian Gulf.
Since its organization in 1965, the 12th Combat Aviation Brigade has served as a key member of the combined arms team, dedicated to the preservation of peace. The Brigade's motto, "Wings of Victory," continues to exemplify the standard by which the brigade conducts its missions in support of the United States of America. The brigade is currently based around Ansbach, Bavaria, in Germany, and headquartered in Katterbach Kaserne, with subordinate units in Illesheim Army Airfields and Wiesbaden. In March 2013, for the first time since 2007, the entire 12th CAB returned to Germany where they continue to train and operate in support of EUCOM and AFRICOM contingency missions. The 12th CAB is currently reorganizing.
(Picture: © Pierre Taquet)

 (© Pierre Taquet) (© Pierre Taquet)
 (© Alain Debras) (© Jacques Vincent)
 (© Jacques Vincent) (© Jacques Vincent)

The Air Support Unit of the Belgian Federal Police was created within the old Gendarmery. In October 1993, it settled in buildings made available by the air force at Melsbroek Airbase (Military part of Brussels Airport). The Air Support Unit was now able to use also light aircraft. In the mid 90's, it became clear that due to their advanced age, the Aerospatiale Puma and Alouette II helicopters needed to be replaced. Since the decommissioning of their first Puma and the crash of its second Puma in Lyon, the Gendarmery had only one bi-turbine helicopter left. This was a problem as two engines are required, for security reasons, to fly over large cities. The first MD900 Explorer (G-10) joined the Air Support Unit on January 21st, 1997. This multipurpose helicopter was to become the flagship of the unit. She is equipped with a high quality camera and image transmission system and this was proved at many occasions. A short while later, the unit received two similar helicopters, the G11 and the G-12. In 1999, after 30 years of good and loyal service, the last Alouette II helicopters were demobilised and replaced by two new MD520N's equipped with the NOTAR (NO TAil Rotor) system, just like the MD 900. In 2010, a MD902 model (G-16) joined the unit, making it possible for the older G-10, G-11 and G-12 helicopters to undergo major work to extend their operational lifetime (Midlife Update). The last MLU (G-12) was completed in 2014. 
(
Picture: © Serge van Oosterzee)

 (© Serge Van Heertum) (© Serge Van Heertum)

In 1971 three Sud Aviation SA316B Alouette III helicopters were acquired for the Belgian Navy for use as supply aircraft for ships at sea. They where primarily deployed on the supply ship A960 Godetia and A961 Zinnia. The three helicopters operated by the Marine Flight reported to 40 Squadron of the Belgian Air Force but were maintained and flown by Navy personnel. Since 1980 the Alouette's can deploy on other ships as well and as such have operated from Dutch ships in the Caribbean. Since 2004 the three helicopters are completely integrated within 40 Squadron of the Belgian Air Component under command of the 1st Wing. One of the last remarquable missions was the "Pedro" role in the Persian Gulf for the Aircraft Carrier "Charles de Gaule".
(Picture: © Serge Van Heertum)

 (© Serge Van Heertum) (© Serge van Oosterzee)
 (© Serge Van Heertum) (© Serge van Oosterzee)

On December 8th, 1988 the Belgian Government decided to acquire 46 Agusta A109BA Hirundo helicopters (BA for Belgian Army). These aircraft replaced a number of Alouette II light helicopters in the armed reconnaissance role (HRecce, with machine guns) and observation role (HO). The Agusta's were also used for anti-tank missions, equipped with Helitow anti-tank missiles (HA), tactical support missions equipped with rocket launchers (HLR), as Medevac helicopter (Medical Evacuation) (HMed) and transport helicopter (HTpt). Since early 2003 all Hirundos were brought up to the same multirole standard and were operated by the 17th and 18th Squadron MRH (Multi-role helicopter). As a consequence of the reorganisations of the Belgian Defence all Agusta helicopters were transferred to the Air Component from the Army Component while a number of the Hirundo's have been withdrawn from use and stored at Zutendaal airbase pending their sale. The remaining operational Agusta's are based at Beauvechain airbase as part of the 1st Wing. Currently 13 machines remain in use but the amount is planned to decrease to 8 units. Since the NH90 TTH arrival allocated to the 18 Squadron, only the 17 Squadron operates the Italian helicopter.
(Picture: © Serge van Oosterzee)

 (© Anthony Graulus) (© Jacques Vincent)
 (© Patrick Brouckaert) (© Patrick Brouckaert)
 (© Serge Van Heertum)
 (© Alain Debras) (© Serge van Oosterzee)

Following the April 2007 approval by the Belgian Government's confirmation, the NATO Helicopter Management Agency (NAHEMA) which manages the design, development, production and logistics of the NH90, signed on behalf of Belgium, a contract with NH Industries to supply Belgium with a total of ten NH90 helicopters. These ten NH90 include four aircraft in the TTH (Tactical Transport Helicopter) version, four in the NFH (NATO Frigate Helicopter) version - and two optional. Belgium was the 14th country ordering the NH90 and the sixth to join NAHEMA, the international program organisation representing Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands and Portugal. On September 18th, 2012, the first NH90 (TTH version) intended for Belgium made its initial flight and was delivered to its home base Beauvechain on October 2nd, 2013. In January 2014 the NH Industries company name was officially changed into Airbus Helicopters.
Delivery to the Belgian Air Force:
NFH version RN01: August 2013 - RN02: May 2014 - RN03: December 2014 - RN: 04: August 2015
TTH version RN05: December 2012 - RN06: January 2014 - RN07: June 2014 - RN08: November 2014
(Picture: © Alain Debras)

 (© Patrick Brouckaert) (© Serge Van Heertum)
 (© Serge Van Heertum) (© Patrick Brouckaert)
 (© Patrick Brouckaert)
 (© Alain Debras) (© Patrick Brouckaert)

For the replacement of the old Sikorsky HSS1/S58 in the Air-Sea Rescue role, the Belgian government ordered five Westland Seaking Mk.48 helicopters in April 1975. In a first stage, all aircraft were used for training Belgian aircrews and based at RNAS Culdrose before being delivered to Koksijde airbase in November 1976. All aircraft have since undergone several updates including replacement of the radar by a vastly more capable version and the installation of a FLIR (Forward Looking Infra-Red) camera. The most remarkable intervention of the Seakings took place after the disaster with the "Herald of Free Enterprise" off the coast at Zeebrugge on March 6th, 1987. Three Seakings of N° 40 Squadron were able to rescue 30 passengers from a certain death. After more than 30 years of service the Seaking is to be replaced by the NH Industries NH90 helicopter in the years to come, but currently three machines are still in operation. More about the Belgian Seaking: http://www.sbap.be/events/2016/002ebfnsk2016/002ebfnsk2016.htm
(Picture: © Alain Debras)

 (© Alain Debras) (© Alain Debras)
 
Static display, Exhibitions and Ambiance
 
Piper L-21B Super Cub towing plane for the Royal Belgian Air Cadets
(© Bruno Ghils)
H03 was stored in 2004 and used for firebrigade training
(© Patrick Brouckaert)
 UAV Unmanned aerial vehicle B-Hunter code 288 with a new dark grey painting (© Anthony Graulus) Not a noisy fighter but always interesting
(© Pierre Taquet)
 Siai Marchetti SF.260M link trainer made with the wrecks of the ST-33 who made a belly landing on June 24th, 1996  (© Patrick Brouckaert) The dashboard of the link trainer ST-33
(© Jacques Vincent)
Lycoming 0-540E-4-A5 engine from the SF.260M
(© Jacques Vincent)
Alpha Jet 1B AT08 without ejection seats; seems that this plane will be dedicated for static display only like the FA05  (© Jacques Vincent)
 Lockheed-Martin F-16A; the FA-05 is dedicated only for the static exhibitions and is flying very low level all around the country
(© Jacques Vincent)
 Eurocopter EC120B Colibri OO-DTE from Heliventure
(© Pierre Taquet)
Aerospatiale SA-313B Alouette ll F-GURJ from Héli-Nord
(© Pierre Taquet)
 Magni Gyro M24 Orion
(© Pierre Taquet)
The Bell 47G-2 OO-MBE from Busse Helikopters was built in 1956
(© Pierre Taquet)
 Aeriane Swift Lite
(© Pierre Taquet)
Pipistrel Taurus
(© Pierre Taquet)
 Youngsters entertainment…  (© Pierre Taquet) (1) & (© Bruno Ghils) (2 & 3)
 On board the Mil-Mi35
(© Bruno Ghils)
(© Bruno Ghils)
 (© Bruno Ghils) Maybe a future sniper career…
(© Bruno Ghils)
 Some vehicles: MOWAG Piranha IIIC in MEDEVAC version
(© Serge van Oosterzee)
MOWAG Piranha IIIC with 30mm Elbit UT-30 turret
(© Serge van Oosterzee)
 Dingo 2 MPPV
(© Serge van Oosterzee)
Mercedes-Benz Unimog Redux
(© Alain Debras)
 JCB light multi-purpose wheeled vehicle
(© Alain Debras)
Renault VMA 105B Fire Truck
(© Bruno Ghils)
 
 Mercedes-Benz Unimog Ambulance
(© Alain Debras)
The new firefighting truck...a big one!
(© Alain Debras)
 Rosenbauer Panther CA5 6x6  (© Alain Debras)
 Some WWII vehicles: Willys Jeep
(© Serge Van Heertum)
(© Serge Van Heertum)
 M8 Greyhound Armored Car
(© Serge Van Heertum)
M3 Half-track
 (© Serge Van Heertum)
 
Flying Program
 
 (© Bruno Ghils)
 1/3 scale Fokker DR.1 radio-controlled model
(© Pierre Taquet)
Simply amazing…
(© Pierre Taquet)
 Belgian Army parachute display
(© Bruno Ghils)
(© Bruno Ghils)
 Agusta A109BA solo display
(© Bruno Ghils)
"Kevin" and "Stijn" in action
(© Bruno Ghils)
 (© Bruno Ghils) (© Bruno Ghils)
 
 (© Pierre Taquet)
 (© Jacques Vincent) The intervention area is secured by the US Army AH-64D Apache and the A109BA  (Courtesy: © Michael Moors ComOpsAir IPR)
 In a dust cloud
(© Serge van Oosterzee)
High protection...
(© Alain Debras)
 The 12th Combat Aviation Brigade crest is clearly visible
(© Alain Debras)
(© Jacques Vincent)
 (© Pierre Taquet) The AH-64D de l'US Army is a rarity in the airshow
(Courtesy: © Michael Moors ComOpsAir IPR)
 A109BA with a gunner in position
(© Serge Van Heertum)
(© Bruno Ghils)
 (© Alain Debras) (© Jacques Vincent)
 Arrival of the troops on board a NH90 TTH
(© Jacques Vincent)
(© Bruno Ghils)
 (© Serge Van Heertum) F-16AM attack of the area
(© Alain Debras)
 (© Serge Van Heertum) (© Serge van Oosterzee)
 Second wave, fast roping also from a NH90 TTH
(Courtesy: © Michael Moors ComOpsAir IPR)
(© Alain Debras)
 (© Bruno Ghils) Troops in place…
(© Serge Van Heertum)
 (© Bruno Ghils) (© Alain Debras)
 Interception of the suspect by a dog
(© Alain Debras)
The suspect is taken away
(© Bruno Ghils)
 An injured person is to be deplored during the intervention…
(© Alain Debras)
He is evacuated by an A109 Medevac kept under guard during the procedure
(Courtesy: © Michael Moors ComOpsAir IPR)
 (© Alain Debras) (© Pierre Taquet)
 (© Pierre Taquet) The heavy equipment is taken under sling by an NH90 TTH
(© Alain Debras)
 The F-16AM duo: FA92 & FA128
 (© Bruno Ghils)
A last pass for the Power Demo participants
(© Serge Van Heertum)
 

This page is dedicated to Colonel-Aviator Georges Franchomme, Base Commander, and his personal of the 1st Wing at Beauvechain, who put everything forward to make it all happen and successful and for their warm and friendly welcome. Good show 1st Wing!

 
Col Avi Georges Franchomme BaseCo and ADC Michel Jacques, 
thanks for the warm welcome on the base
Courtesy: © Michael Moors ComOpsAir IPR)
The BaseCo and the Cpt Focquet who had the main organization in hand...
Goodshow for the event!
(© Alain Debras)
 Day is over...the 1st Heli Wing is always ready for operational interventions... (© Patrick Brouckaert)

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